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Press Release

Monday, June 9

AWB Leads DC Trip in Support of Export-Import Bank

Washington state businesses seek state delegation’s support for key trade financer

OLYMPIA — On Tuesday, the Association of Washington Business will lead a group of five employers to Washington, D.C., seeking reauthorization of the Export-Import Bank charter.

The “Ex-Im” offers loans and guarantees to foreign purchasers of U.S. manufactured goods who meet strict lending qualifications when private-sector lenders can’t or won’t provide financing. From 2007-2014, the Ex-Im bank supported more than $230 billion in sales nationally and $110 billion in sales in the state of Washington.

Of the 183 exporters in the state of Washington that use the Ex-Im bank, 133 are small- and medium-sized businesses. Manufacturing and agriculture are among the top Washington industries that rely on Ex-Im bank: Ste. Michelle Winery and Calaway Trading are the second and third-largest users of Ex-Im credit programs.

“Failure to renew Ex-Im’s charter would be devastating for Washington’s trade-dependent economy,” said Kris Johnson, president of AWB. “Ex-Im serves as an important trade lifeline for many small- and medium-sized Washington state businesses. Without their support, shipments of our famous wines and other popular agricultural products would be jeopardized, and with so much of our economy tied to exports, it becomes even more imperative that we continue the Ex-Im charter.”

During the visit, the group will meet with seven members of the Washington state congressional delegation, including Sens. Patty Murray and Maria Cantwell, along with Congressional Reps. Cathy McMorris Rodgers, Suzan DelBene, Doc Hastings, Denny Heck and Derek Kilmer.

Member businesses and chambers participating in the visit include:

Follow them on Twitter:
#AWBinDC and #exim4jobs


About the Association of Washington Business

Formed in 1904, the Association of Washington Business is Washington’s oldest and largest statewide business association, and includes more than 8,100 members representing 700,000 employees. AWB serves as both the state’s chamber of commerce and the manufacturing and technology association. While its membership includes major employers like Boeing, Microsoft and Weyerhaeuser, 90 percent of AWB members employ fewer than 100 people. More than half of AWB’s members employ fewer than 10. For more about AWB, visit www.awb.org.

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