January 8, 2018
Fast Facts
Bringing Business Up to Speed
AWB Events & Resources

AWB's 2018 employment law webinar series begins in February; early bird pricing is still available

Employment law matters to your business. Getting the law right is not an option, but it is also not always easy. Fortunately, AWB is offering a very easy way to get the latest news and best practices on how to comply with increasingly complex employment law.

AWB is hosting a six-month webinar series that covers common employment law topics. We have partnered with some of the state's top employment law experts to give you, the employer and human resource professional, the information you need in 2018 and beyond.

Each webinar will be 60-90 minutes and include ample time for questions. For a limited time, an early-bird package is available that includes all six webinars, a binder for topic materials and wrap-up thumb drive that will include all webinar materials, extra information and sample documents. In addition, participants will receive an annual update of information for two years and a discount code for referrals to the next series.

For details and a full webinar schedule -- and to reserve your spot and early-bird package deal -- visit AWB's website.

For questions or more information please contact Kelli Schueler, AWB member relations and events coordinator, at KelliS@awb.org or 360.943.1600.

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Read the full editorial in The Tri-City Herald
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