November 16, 2015
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Succession Planning Fundamentals Dec. 10: How to transition ownership of your company

Learn how to develop a thoughtful process to address all issues surrounding the most important phase of your business life – successfully transitioning your ownership of your company – at the second succession planning workshop at 10 a.m. is on Thursday, Dec. 10 in Seattle.

Kristofer Gray, CFP® and Paul Hajek will examine many of the common challenges affecting business owners on the subject of succession planning and implementation. They will describe how to develop a thoughtful process to address all issues of transitioning ownership of your business and how to maximize the value of the business, minimize the tax burden of the transition, and help you create the desired legacy.

The goal of succession planning seminar is to help business owners identify, plan for, and achieve personal, business, and financial goals while transitioning out of their companies.

Registration is now open. This seminar was held earlier this year and was filled to capacity, so register today.



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Slowdown Hurt Everyone

Congress Must Act On Ports

By The Editorial Board of The Columbian

Rep. Dan Newhouse, R-Yakima, has brought about legislation that would trigger federal involvement in port disputes. In introducing the bill named Ensuring Continued Operations and No Other Major Incidents, Closures or Slowdowns -- ECONOMICS -- Newhouse said, "We must take the lesson of the most recent ports slowdown to heart that two parties cannot hold hostage the nation's economy." Among the co-sponsors are Republican Washington lawmakers Cathy McMorris Rodgers and Dave Reichert.

In February, the International Business Times reported that the slowdown was costing the U.S. economy about $2 billion a day, and others have asserted that it contributed to anemic national economic growth at the end of 2014 and through the early months of 2015. That impact was particularly strong in Washington, the nation's most trade-dependent state, a fact that makes legislative action especially pertinent to the region and calls for the rest of the area's congressional delegation to support the proposed bills.

Click here to read the full editorial in The Columbian
An Educational Monopoly

Is Public Education a 'Natural' Monopoly That Needs to Be Broken Up?


By Sean Gill, research analyst at the University of Washington's Center on Reinventing Public Education


There are many reasons why education does not fit the definition of a natural monopoly. Schools are human-driven enterprises. They are hugely dependent on people -- that is the teachers who are so important to education. Yes, schools have to have buildings and textbooks, but these capital costs don't outweigh the cost of labor.

Further, education is the provision of learning and knowledge -- it is about as far away from the definition of commodity as possible. My neighbors and need exactly the same electrical service -- an electron is an electron. But learning can take an infinite number of forms, based on children's needs and interests.

A top-down, centralized approach isn't going to meet these needs and interests.

Click here to read the full blog post via the74million.org
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